My Blog
By Children's Ear, Nose and Throat Associate
November 22, 2019
Category: Otolaryngology
Tags: Nosebleeds  

Nosebleeds happen to most of us at some point during our lifetime. While it can be startling, nosebleeds are typically harmless and nothing to worry about. Of course, if you battle nosebleeds rather regularly you may be wondering what’s going on and whether you should turn to an otolaryngologist for an evaluation. Here’s what you should know about getting a nosebleed.

Common Causes of a Nosebleed

The blood vessels within our nose are very delicate, which means that they are prone to bursting and causing nosebleeds. Therefore, the two most common causes of nosebleeds are nose picking and dry air. Dry air can dry out the nasal passages, which leaves the area prone to infection and cracking.

Other causes include:

  • Repeated nose blowing
  • Allergies
  • Broken nose
  • Acute or chronic sinusitis (a sinus infection)
  • Common cold
  • Irritants
  • Certain allergy medications (these medications can dry out the nose)
  • Traumatic injury to the nose
  • Deviated septum
  • Bleeding disorders
  • High altitude
  • Excessive use of blood thinners or anti-inflammatory medications

There are two main types of nosebleeds: anterior and posterior. An anterior nosebleed is a bleed that originates in the septum of the nose (the wall that separates the two nasal passages). These nosebleeds are minor and can be treated with home care. If your child experiences nosebleeds an anterior nosebleed is usually the cause.

Posterior nosebleeds occur further back in the nose where the artery branches are located. This type of nosebleed is much heavier, occurs more often in adults and may require medical care. While rare, it is possible for a posterior nosebleed to be a sign of high blood pressure or a blood disorder (e.g. hemophilia).

When to See a Doctor

While most people will be able to treat a simple nosebleed on their own without having to seek medical care, it’s important to see a doctor right away if:

  • Your nosebleed is affecting your ability to breath
  • Bleeding lasts more than 20 minutes
  • Your nosebleed is the result of a traumatic injury or accident
  • There is a significant amount of blood

While it’s not considered an emergency situation, it is a good idea to talk with your ENT doctor if you or your child experiences nosebleeds often. During an evaluation an ear, nose and throat doctor can ask you questions about your symptoms, perform a quick examination of the nose and determine the underlying cause of your persistent nosebleeds.

If you are concerned about you or your child’s nosebleeds then it’s best to play it safe and to schedule an appointment with an otolaryngologist. Call our office today.

By Children's Ear, Nose and Throat Associate
November 18, 2019
Category: Otolaryngology
Tags: Tonsillitis  

Is your child dealing with a sore throat? It could be tonsillitis.

While you might not think much about your tonsils, the structures that lie in the back of the throat, they are an important part of your body’s natural defense system to help you fight infection. Unfortunately, even tonsils can become infected. This infection is known as tonsillitis. Know the signs that your child might have tonsillitis and find out when to turn to our Maitland and Orlando, FL, children’s otolaryngologists for treatment.

What are the signs and symptoms of tonsillitis?

Tonsillitis leads to red, swollen and painful tonsils. There may be pain with swallowing, ear pain, a severe sore throat, jaw tenderness, fever, chills and a headache. If your child has very enlarged tonsils or is having trouble swallowing or eating food then you should see your Maitland and Orlando, FL, pediatric ENT doctor right away.

What causes tonsillitis?

A viral infection is usually to blame; however, tonsillitis can also be caused by the same bacteria that cause strep throat (streptococcus bacteria). Bacterial forms of tonsillitis can be contagious.

Will tonsillitis go away on its own?

The good news is that many cases of tonsillitis will go away on its own once the body has had time to fight the viral infection. It can take up to 10 days for your child to start feeling better and it’s important that during this time that your child rest, stay hydrated and use certain over-the-counter pain relievers to ease symptoms. Of course, if your child’s symptoms are severe or get worse then you should bring them in for a proper evaluation. If your child’s tonsillitis is caused by strep then antibiotics will be necessary to treat the bacterial infection.

When do tonsils need to be removed?

Rarely do tonsils need to be removed; however, a tonsillectomy may be recommended if your child or teen deals with recurring infections (about seven times in one year) or if their tonsillitis causes sleep apnea or other potentially serious issues.

From hearing screenings and allergy testing to treating throat problems and ear infections, the medical team at Children's Ear, Nose, Throat & Allergy Associates of Maitland and Orlando, FL, is here to help. If your child or teen is experiencing symptoms of tonsillitis call our office at (407) 253-1000 right away.

By Children's Ear, Nose and Throat Associate
November 08, 2019
Category: Otolaryngology

Cancer can grow anywhere in the body, even the head and neck. These cancers are twice as common among men and they are usually diagnosed in adults over 50 years old. The common types of head and neck cancer include:

  • Oral cavity
  • Oropharnygeal (in the throat or back of the mouth)
  • Nasal cavity
  • Paranasal sinus
  • Nasopharyngeal
  • Laryngeal (in the voice box)
  • Hypopharyngeal (behind or beside the voice box)

Most of the time people don’t find out that they have head and neck cancer until symptoms start to surface that warrant visiting the doctor. Sometimes a dentist may be able to pinpoint early changes during your routine dental cleanings; however, your doctor may send you to an otolaryngologist for a more comprehensive evaluation and diagnosis.

During your evaluation, an ENT doctor will ask you questions regarding your current health and any symptoms you are experiencing. From there, your doctor will determine the best tests to perform to detect head and neck cancer. These tests may include a physical examination of the head and neck, a CT or MRI scan, or a biopsy.

If you are diagnosed with head and neck cancer the first thing your doctor will want to do is determine what stage the cancer is (which simply means determining how far the cancer has spread). The stages let us know the extent of the cancer’s growth but also which organs have been affected or could soon be affected. Stages of cancer range from 0-4, with the lower stages indicating that the cancer hasn’t spread to other organs or isn’t spreading quickly.

Treating Head and Neck Cancer

Today, there are many treatment options for head and neck cancer and your doctor will be able to go through the different options to determine the right plan for you. The type of treatment or treatments you will receive will depend on the stage and location of your cancer.

Localized treatments such as surgery or radiation are used to treat only the cancer and do not affect the body as a whole, while systemic treatments such as chemo and targeted therapy drugs will affect the whole body. Systemic treatments are often used on patients with more advanced stages of cancer that have spread to other areas of the body.

Surgery may be recommended if the cancer isn’t in a difficult location in which to operate. Surgery can be performed to remove lymph nodes from the neck or to remove part or all of a structure such as the voice box or jawbone.

If you are noticing changes in your voice, an oral sore or lesion that doesn’t heal, or a mass in the head or neck region it’s a good idea to see your ear, nose, and throat doctor right away for a thorough examination. The sooner head and neck cancer is detected the better.

By Children's Ear, Nose and Throat Associate
October 30, 2019
Category: Otolaryngology
Tags: Mouth Sores   Mouth  

Woman in pain from mouth soresAlso known as canker sores and ulcers, mouth sores usually result from bite injuries or allergic reactions. They can also be a symptom of an underlying health condition. Unlike cold sores, which are caused by the herpes simplex virus (HS1 and HS2) and develop on the lips and the skin around the mouth, non-Herpes related mouth sores can form on the gums, tongue, lips, the lining of the cheeks and throat. Canker sores are not contagious, and usually clear up on their own. They tend to be painful and can be treated with topical over the counter analgesics, mouthwashes and rinses. If mouth sores do not resolve on their own and last longer than three weeks, it may be necessary to seek treatment from an ear, nose and throat (ENT) doctor.

Common Causes of Mouth Ulcers and Canker Sores

Accidental biting is the most common cause, along with friction from toothbrushing, orthodontics or dentures. Diet can also play a role, in the form of food allergies to anything from coffee, chocolate and highly acidic foods and citrus fruits. Deficiencies of essential vitamins and minerals like folic acid, B12, iron, folate and zinc can also cause mouth ulcers. Sodium lauryl sulfate in toothpaste and oral bacteria like Helicobacter pylori (which is also responsible for stomach ulcers) can cause lesions in the mouth as well.

Lifestyle factors like smoking and elevated stress levels are another cause. Ulcers that persist for more than a few weeks, do not respond to self-care and over the counter treatments and are accompanied by additional symptoms like fever, excessive pain, swelling and difficulty eating and drinking, can be a sign of an underlying medical condition.

Schedule an appointment with an ENT (ear, nose and throat doctor) if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms:

  • swollen lymph nodes
  • fever
  • difficulty swallowing or speaking

Is an Underlying Medical Condition Causing My Mouth Sores?

Persistent and chronic mouth sores can sometimes be a symptom of immune deficiencies or inflammatory conditions like lupus, Celiac, Behcet's and Chron's Disease. Contact an ear, nose and throat specialist (ENT) for more information on treatment options and symptom relief.

By Children's Ear, Nose and Throat Associate
October 22, 2019
Category: Otolaryngology
Tags: hearing loss  
Protect your hearingIf you think you might be losing your hearing, you’re not alone. In fact, according to the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) more than 30% of adults over 65 have some degree of hearing loss. That includes 14% of people between the ages of 45 and 64 have some degree of hearing difficulty.
 
There are many signs and symptoms of hearing loss you should pay attention to, including if you:
  • Hear muffled speech or sounds
  • Have a problem understanding individual words
  • Need people to speak more loudly or slowly
  • Have to turn up the television or radio
  • Withdraw from social events or conversations
There are many causes of hearing loss including aging, continuous exposure to loud noises, heredity, ear infections or damage to your ears from pressure changes, and even a buildup of earwax.
 
The best thing you can do is to prevent hearing loss and damage to your ears. You should:
  • Protect your ears by wearing earplugs or earmuffs if you are in a loud workplace
  • Have your hearing tested by an audiologist or ENT specialist. Current recommendations are to have your hearing tested at least every 10 years through age 50, and every three years after age 50.
  • Protect your ears from damaging loud noises in your daily activities and recreation, especially listening to rock concerts, shooting guns or riding in loud vehicles.
  • Take breaks from continuous loud noises.
If you think you are experiencing hearing loss, don’t wait until your hearing gets worse! Schedule a hearing test and find out just how many sounds and conversation you might be missing. Hearing screenings are an inexpensive and quick way to give you peace of mind.
 
There are many treatment options available for hearing loss, including several types of hearing aids and cochlear implants. You and your audiologist or ENT specialist can decide which option is best for you depending on the degree of your hearing loss and your individual wishes. Don’t miss out on your life; call today and hear better tomorrow!




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